Photography and Psychology.

I don’t really classify myself as a great photographer, not even remotely average but I like to dabble, I guess I’m just one of those stereotypical hobbyists who dreams but never really accomplishes anything great. I use my iPhone and recently downloaded a great app, ProCam5 (click here) which all you elite iPhone photography experts and photographers who use your iPhone as a trusty companion to your Canon or Nikon will either know or know of. The closest I’ve got to owning a pretty decent DSLR was a Nikon D3200 which a friend bought me with the standard VRII lens kit (now discontinued since there are now newer, much more impressive models on the market with better ease of function and other VERY cool functions. I sadly had to let that Nikon go due to something that was going on in my life at the time and had to get rid of it in a long painful story which could have changed my life for the better which seems to have affected me in the long term but they do say time is a healer. Lets not dilly dally on that though as the focus of this blog is photography and psychology – interesting mix but I am more a photographer than a psychologist, still an interesting over-lap between the two.

I have a number of friends who are much more talented than I am, we are mostly Nikon fans but another friend of mine who is a well established, successful wedding photographer is a Canon man (I know, we all can’t be perfect, right. I jest) but anyway, when it comes to photography I like landscape photography but we all have different interests in what our eye catches. Some it’s landscape, others it’s people, others its buildings etc. Another friend of mine from Hungary is also a fan of landscape photography and yesterday he took a photo and his caption in Hungarian was “current mood”. It was a stunning photo — black & white of a fallen tree across the river where I live. It pictured the mood brilliantly where there was only solitude and a single tree.

That then made me think of one of my photos that I took in February, was a fairly warm winters day, a few weeks  prior to the “Beast from the East”, that the UK keeps getting hit by. The view on its own as it was to the human eye was beautiful but as a storm was raging in the distance I felt a storm in side of me raging. And whilst there were black clouds in front of me, on my back the sun was shining on the grass. I decided to edit via Photoshop Express and below was the final result…

So with all this in mind isn’t it incredible how our love of photography can reflect our mood, it can reflect our mood perfectly, or terribly – depending on how you see it.

Anyway folks – here’s an excercise for all you who love photography, whether its just looking at photographs or shooting. The next time you see a friends or family members photo, caption or not attached to that photo try engage with the piece of work, note every detail down – the sky, the objects, the colour and then try gauge the mood that photo was taken under. My reason for this is I think when the majority of us look at a photo we think how stunning it is, but I don’t think we analyse the photo. I’m not particularly in the best of moods today so my photos would probably all be darkish but I sure think that would be a great exercise for us all.